Cathryn Miller and Monique Martin: The Absolute Way of Things

Cathryn Miller and Monique Martin: The Absolute Way of Things


January 17 to March 22, 2015
Opens: Friday, January 16 at 8 p.m.

Using bees as the subject, the works explore the fragile nature of existence, the interplay between humans and small creatures, and the communications patterns of our world. The large-scale prints explore the relationships within the hives and how those relationships mimic and contradict those in the human population. The cyclical nature of bee and human populations is represented through the sequential nature of the artwork.

Both the newly recognized loss of bee populations and the historical links between bees and humans are referenced in the artwork.

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tammi

Tammi Campbell and Kara Uzelman: concerning certain events


January 17 to March 22, 2015
Opens: Friday, January 16 at 7 p.m.
Talk/Tour: Sunday, February 8 at 1 p.m. with artists’  Tammi Campbell and Kara Uzelmann: concerning certain events

Saskatchewan is known for many things. Home of medicare, the first arts board in North America, wheat, big skies, and The Englishman’s Boy. With the only elected socialist government in North America, Saskatchewan had a particular appeal in the 1940s and 50s: utopian chutzpah and an exotic locale.  Amongst the legendary outcomes of this period are the Emma Lake Artists’ Workshops and research undertaken into the therapeutic use of LSD. Tammi Campbell and Kara Uzelman are two Saskatchewan artists who are taking their artistic cues from this particular history.

Campbell’s work is a sustained investigation into the function of modernist painting, with a specific interest in artists who played a role in the development of abstraction here. She plays with the tropes and language of hard-edge abstraction especially, and is in that sense a painter’s painter. A series dedicated to Agnes Martin, a simple pencil sketch that Campbell executes each day she works in the studio, entices by its salutation, Dear Agnes, but denies the viewer any legible content. Her practice is a meditation on the process of making.

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crossings

Border Crossings Study Centre


January 17 to March 22, 2015
Opens: Friday, January 16 at 7 p.m.

Border Crossings magazine is one of the key platforms for the investigation of contemporary Canadian and international art and culture. Founded in 1977 by Robert Enright, this quarterly magazine is published in Winnipeg, and is responsible for bringing international attention to art production on the Prairies.

The Border Crossings Study Centre (BCSC) was developed by the magazine as a unique, mobile archive of the magazine’s 32-year publishing history, and includes copies of each of the magazines to date. It is housed in a portable hybrid storage/reading unit designed by architects Neil Minuk (DIN), and Karen Shanski and Eduardo Aquino (spmb). The archive is made up of the magazines themselves and, where issues were no longer available, handmade facsimiles were produced by Canadian photographer Elaine Stocki. It provides a welcoming social space for readers to look at individual issues, refer to the extensive Index, and talk about the material in the 127 issues of the magazine.

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Ursula Biemann: Deep Weather

Ursula Biemann: Deep Weather


January 17 to March 22, 2015
Opens: Friday, January 16 at 7 p.m.

The 2013 video, Deep Weather is a nine-minute glimpse of the Alberta tar sands, juxtaposed with the watery world of Bangladesh. The whispered, confiding voice-over makes viewers feel immediately complicit in the actions unfolding here. Deep Weather explores the devastating consequences of oil extraction. Aerial images of the scarred landscape of the Canadian tar sands give a sense of the vast scale of the damage: ashen contours, littered with the occasional digger, stretch over an area the size of England.

While human actions are paramount in what happens to the Earth, we have little awareness of, or control over, fluid and invisible global interactions. The enormous open-pit mines and steam processing of the oil-infused sand and clay of northern Alberta have drastically lowered Athabasca River flow to the Arctic Ocean; poisoned tailing ponds are replacing the boreal forests, altering ecology for an unknown future. Land is reduced to a commodity by multinational corporations with little or no concern for the planet’s future well-being.

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WarRugs

Battleground: War Rugs from Afghanistan


January 17 to March 22, 2015
Opens: Friday, January 16 at 7 p.m.
Talk/Tour:  Friday, January 16 at 7 p.m. with Shauna McCabe, Executive Director, Textile Museum of Canada

The terror of bombs falling from the sky and landmines exploding from the earth is revealed in Battleground: War Rugs from Afghanistan. Through three decades of international and civil war, Afghans have borne witness to disaster by weaving unprecedented images of battle and weaponry into their rugs. This touring exhibition tells the story of the Afghan world turned upside down.

The exhibition presents dozens of fascinating, woven documents of social and cultural events in Afghanistan from the last quarter of the 20th century, highlighting the critical role that creative practice plays in a global context.

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Michèle Mackasey: Cheryl Kemp and her Family (detail), 2010, 5ft h x 6.5ft w, Acrylic on linen

Michèle Mackasey: face à nous


Saskatchewan-based artist Michèle Mackasey has created a new body of work that puts the spotlight on single mothers. In Mackasey’s life-size paintings, the artist imbues her subjects with the dignity and status associated for centuries with portrait painting. Yet these portraits depict families who continue to live on the margins, facing prejudice and economic hardship as the mothers balance the roles of sole provider and caregiver.

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Courtney Milne, image from The Pool Project (detail), 2000-2010

Courtney Milne


The Pool Project is an unique collaborative exhibition that brings together 40 of Courtney Milne’s stunning colour photographs of the surface of his outdoor swimming pool, captured over the course of a decade (2000-2010) with the spiritual musings and reflections of a broad array of local and international personalities. The Pool Project is both a celebration of Milne’s unique ability to capture the qualities of light, colour, and texture and an opportunity for visitors of all backgrounds to contemplate aspects of the spiritual through art.

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Jayce Salloum, map of the world (detail), 2000-2007. Tentest/cellutex/donnaconda boards, drawing with collage of photographs, objects & documents

Jayce Salloum: history of the present


A mid-career survey of this acclaimed Canadian artist’s photo- and video-based installations, the exhibition explores identity, migration, and shifting global territories. Curated by Jen Budney, the exhibition is a co-production of the Mendel Art Gallery, the Kamloops Art Gallery and the Confederation Centre Art Gallery in Charlottetown, PEI. Vancouver-based Salloum, whose grandparents emigrated from Lebanon to rural Saskatchewan in the 1930s, has exhibited his work extensively internationally for more than 20 years. His vast archive of photos, documents and souvenirs offers open-ended narratives and celebrates ephemeral beauty.

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Ruth Cuthand, Yellow Fever (detail), 2009. Beads and paint on suedeboard. Collection of the Mendel Art Gallery

RUTH CUTHAND: BACK TALK (Works 1983–2009)


RUTH CUTHAND: BACK TALK is a comprehensive, mid-career retrospective of one of Saskatchewan’s most significant contemporary artists. For over 30 years, this Saskatoon-based artist has been challenging mainstream perspectives on colonialism and the relationships between “settlers” and Natives in a practice marked by political invective, humour, and a deliberate crudeness of style. The exhibition brings together a comprehensive selection of artworks produced between 1983 and 2009.

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William Perehudoff, Threshing Outfit (detail), 1955. Ink on paper

William Perehudoff: Historical Drawings for the Western Producer


Over the course of William Perehudoff’s long career he produced paintings in a wide range of styles from small representational watercolours to the huge striped canvasses which are perhaps his best known work. In 1952 he began a 25 year long career as art director at Modern Press, a company owned by the Saskatchewan Wheat Pool, and publisher of the weekly Western Producer. In this provincially touring exhibition from the permanent collection of the Mendel Art Gallery, we present illustrations from two serial articles published by The Western Producer in 1955.

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Peter Aliknak, Goose Hunting (detail), 1972. Stonecut on paper

Inuit Art from the Mendel Collection: Tradition and Innovation


In this offering of work from the Mendel Art Gallery’s Permanent Collection, a diverse selection of stone carvings, drawings, prints and paintings provides a fresh look at the unmistakable art of the Inuit. Through biographical evidence and the personal testimony of some significant figures, this exhibition attempts to distinguish the traditional aspects of Inuit art from the radical innovations that resulted from contact with Western culture. The story of this cultural exchange is an engaging one and the resulting art is utterly unique, the inspired creation of some of the world’s most inventive artists.

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Willaim Perehudoff, AC-65-6 (detail), acrylic on canvas. 1965

The Optimism of Colour: William Perehudoff —a retrospective


The Optimism of Colour is a major retrospective of the works of renowned Canadian abstract painter William Perehudoff. Drawn from public and private Canadian collections, the exhibition was organized for the Mendel Art Gallery by guest curator Karen Wilkin, of New York City. The exhibition features more than 60 works, tracing the evolution of Perehudoff’s approach from early figurative works and murals to radiant abstractions, their interplays of colour suggesting musical chords. The exhibition emphasizes these latter works, which established the artist’s reputation nationally and internationally. The accompanying book-length catalogue, written in English and translated into French, is a lavishly illustrated account of Perehudoff’s career. It is the most comprehensive overview to date of the artist’s early work in conjunction with his later abstract paintings.

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James Henderson, Road to the Valley Lake (detail). From the exhibition James Henderson: Wicite Owapi Wicasa

James Henderson: Wicite Owapi Wicasa


James Henderson: Wicite Owapi Wicasa, the man who paints the old men is a major exhibition of the portraits, landscape paintings, and commercial work of Scottish-born artist James Henderson, Saskatchewan’s pre-eminent first-generation artist.

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