Cathryn Miller and Monique Martin: The Absolute Way of Things

Cathryn Miller and Monique Martin: The Absolute Way of Things


January 17 to March 22, 2015
Opens: Friday, January 16 at 8 p.m.

Using bees as the subject, the works explore the fragile nature of existence, the interplay between humans and small creatures, and the communications patterns of our world. The large-scale prints explore the relationships within the hives and how those relationships mimic and contradict those in the human population. The cyclical nature of bee and human populations is represented through the sequential nature of the artwork.

Both the newly recognized loss of bee populations and the historical links between bees and humans are referenced in the artwork.

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tammi

Tammi Campbell and Kara Uzelman: concerning certain events


January 17 to March 22, 2015
Opens: Friday, January 16 at 7 p.m.
Talk/Tour: Sunday, February 8 at 1 p.m. with artists’  Tammi Campbell and Kara Uzelmann: concerning certain events

Saskatchewan is known for many things. Home of medicare, the first arts board in North America, wheat, big skies, and The Englishman’s Boy. With the only elected socialist government in North America, Saskatchewan had a particular appeal in the 1940s and 50s: utopian chutzpah and an exotic locale.  Amongst the legendary outcomes of this period are the Emma Lake Artists’ Workshops and research undertaken into the therapeutic use of LSD. Tammi Campbell and Kara Uzelman are two Saskatchewan artists who are taking their artistic cues from this particular history.

Campbell’s work is a sustained investigation into the function of modernist painting, with a specific interest in artists who played a role in the development of abstraction here. She plays with the tropes and language of hard-edge abstraction especially, and is in that sense a painter’s painter. A series dedicated to Agnes Martin, a simple pencil sketch that Campbell executes each day she works in the studio, entices by its salutation, Dear Agnes, but denies the viewer any legible content. Her practice is a meditation on the process of making.

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crossings

Border Crossings Study Centre


January 17 to March 22, 2015
Opens: Friday, January 16 at 7 p.m.

Border Crossings magazine is one of the key platforms for the investigation of contemporary Canadian and international art and culture. Founded in 1977 by Robert Enright, this quarterly magazine is published in Winnipeg, and is responsible for bringing international attention to art production on the Prairies.

The Border Crossings Study Centre (BCSC) was developed by the magazine as a unique, mobile archive of the magazine’s 32-year publishing history, and includes copies of each of the magazines to date. It is housed in a portable hybrid storage/reading unit designed by architects Neil Minuk (DIN), and Karen Shanski and Eduardo Aquino (spmb). The archive is made up of the magazines themselves and, where issues were no longer available, handmade facsimiles were produced by Canadian photographer Elaine Stocki. It provides a welcoming social space for readers to look at individual issues, refer to the extensive Index, and talk about the material in the 127 issues of the magazine.

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Ursula Biemann: Deep Weather

Ursula Biemann: Deep Weather


January 17 to March 22, 2015
Opens: Friday, January 16 at 7 p.m.

The 2013 video, Deep Weather is a nine-minute glimpse of the Alberta tar sands, juxtaposed with the watery world of Bangladesh. The whispered, confiding voice-over makes viewers feel immediately complicit in the actions unfolding here. Deep Weather explores the devastating consequences of oil extraction. Aerial images of the scarred landscape of the Canadian tar sands give a sense of the vast scale of the damage: ashen contours, littered with the occasional digger, stretch over an area the size of England.

While human actions are paramount in what happens to the Earth, we have little awareness of, or control over, fluid and invisible global interactions. The enormous open-pit mines and steam processing of the oil-infused sand and clay of northern Alberta have drastically lowered Athabasca River flow to the Arctic Ocean; poisoned tailing ponds are replacing the boreal forests, altering ecology for an unknown future. Land is reduced to a commodity by multinational corporations with little or no concern for the planet’s future well-being.

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David Thauberger

David Thauberger: Road Trips and Other Diversions


April 11 to June 15, 2014
Opening Reception: Friday, April 11 at 8 p.m.
Talk/Tour: Friday, April 11 at 7 p.m. with curators Sandra Fraser and Timothy Long, and artist David Thauberger.
Documentary Screening: Tuesday, May 6 at 7 p.m. At the Broadway Theatre, Saskatoon, SK
Watch the trailer, visit the website, and download the iOS app.

Regina-based David Thauberger is a nationally recognized artist best known for his iconic paintings of vernacular architecture. Co-curated by Sandra Fraser, Associate Curator at the Mendel Art Gallery, and Timothy Long, Head Curator at the MacKenzie Art Gallery, the exhibition will provide the first comprehensive overview of this remarkable Canadian artist. Road Trips & Other Diversions brings together some 70 paintings, prints and ceramic works, produced from 1971 to 2009 and drawn from more than 30 public and private collections across the country.

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WarRugs

Battleground: War Rugs from Afghanistan


January 17 to March 22, 2015
Opens: Friday, January 16 at 7 p.m.
Talk/Tour:  Friday, January 16 at 7 p.m. with Shauna McCabe, Executive Director, Textile Museum of Canada

The terror of bombs falling from the sky and landmines exploding from the earth is revealed in Battleground: War Rugs from Afghanistan. Through three decades of international and civil war, Afghans have borne witness to disaster by weaving unprecedented images of battle and weaponry into their rugs. This touring exhibition tells the story of the Afghan world turned upside down.

The exhibition presents dozens of fascinating, woven documents of social and cultural events in Afghanistan from the last quarter of the 20th century, highlighting the critical role that creative practice plays in a global context.

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Mendel at night

Celebrate 50 years!


50TH ANNIVERSARY LAUNCH PARTY
Friday, September 26 at 7 p.m.

Everyone is invited to the launch for the fall anniversary season of celebrations. The evening begins with tributes from community members, who will share their Mendel memories.

This is followed by the opening of Modern Visions: The Mendel Art Gallery 50th Anniversary Exhibition, selected from the permanent collection.

Join in a toast to your gallery and enjoy the festivities!

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Sean Weisgerber

Marie Lannoo and Sean Weisgerber: Ricochet


June 27 to September 14, 2014

Opening Reception: Friday, June 27 at 8 p.m.

Sean Weisgerber and Marie Lannoo have shared studio space for close to three years and they have developed their project in response to working in such close proximity. Although working independently, through ongoing critical dialogue and feedback they have created new pieces that are in conversation with one another. Ricochet includes a selection of recent paintings and sculptural works by Weisgerber and Lannoo that reflects their rigorous process-driven practices.

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Convoluted Beauty: In the Company of Emily Carr


June 27 to September 14, 2014

The work of Emily Carr (1871-1945) is nationally respected for its pioneering of modernity in Western Canada. In her early career, Carr travelled to the United Kingdom to study art, determined to expand her creative vision. Instead, her time there (1899 to 1904), proved to be among the more challenging ordeals of her life, culminating in an 18-month hospitalization with the diagnosis of “hysteria.” Surprisingly, it became a formative point in her career, one where she resolutely declared her sense of her own Canadian as well as artistic identity.

This project, curated by Lisa Baldissera, Chief Curator, Mendel Art Gallery, is the first significant presentation of Emily Carr’s work in Saskatchewan in almost 20 years. It considers Carr’s London years to explore notions of the artistic imaginary and artistic identity. It touches on a variety of critical frameworks: the theme of exile, readings of affect and interspecies theory; an examination of hysteria and the clinic which moves beyond the psychoanalytic frameworks of the 1990s, and the concept of “unproductivity” in creative work.

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Adad Hannah

Sympathetic Magic


June 27 to September 14, 2014

Opening Reception: Friday, June 27 at 8 p.m.
Talk/Tour: Saturday, September 13 at 1 p.m. with curator Troy Gronsdahl

Canada has cultivated and maintained a strong symbolic connection with the northern landscape. The artistic production of Canada’s renowned early painters, the Group of Seven and their ilk, has both defined artistic practice at home and Canada abroad. As art historian John O’Brian observes in Wild Art History, “The land and its representations are knotted together, not unlike two other words with an affinity to landscape in contemporary thought — nation and nationalism.” The country as depicted by the progenitors of the Canadian landscape tradition is a pristine, untamed, and unpeopled place. A history of colonization and the development of the modern Canadian state are registered on countless paintings and postcards. Popular depictions of the landscape are telling: Canada is rich in natural beauty, abundant in resources, and open for business.

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Hughes

A Vital Force: The Canadian Group of Painters


June 27 to September 14, 2014

Opening Reception: Friday, June 27 at 8 p.m.
Talk/Tour: Sunday, June 29 at 1 p.m. with curator Alicia Boutilier

The significance of the first exhibition … is that it sums up the growth and development of the liberal spirit and demonstrates what a vital force it is. — Robert Ayre, The Canadian Forum, 1933

The Canadian Group of Painters (CGP) was the first to aspire to cross-country representation of modernist artists. It lasted from 1933 to 1967, but its strength of influence lay in the first two decades of its existence. When it burst upon the scene in its founding year, the Group pronounced itself “a direct outgrowth of the Group of Seven … drawn from the whole of Canada.” Twenty years later, it proclaimed a “tremendous development” had taken place: “This does not necessarily mean that localized imagery has been abandoned by artists, but it does mean that the imagery employed has become more cosmopolitan.”

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Joi_Arcand

Mary Longman and Joi T. Arcand


April 11 to June 15, 2014
Opening Reception: Friday, April 11 at 8 p.m.

Joi T. Arcand creates digital photo work that blends personal narratives with popular culture. Drawing from her experiences as a mixed-race nehiyaw woman, her work merges identity with nostalgia, humour, and kitsch. Connecting past with present, she digitally alters outdated imagery to create new conversations around Indigenous representation in pop culture.

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school-art

School Art


April 11 to June 8, 2014
Public Reception: Sunday, April 13, at 2 p.m.
Event for Teachers: Thursday, May 1, 4:15 to 5:45 p.m.
Student Artist Talks: Sunday, May 11 at 2 p.m. with participating artists.

The Mendel Art Gallery is pleased to present School Art, the highly popular exhibition offered annually for 42 years. Celebrating the excellence of artmaking and creativity among Saskatoon’s young people, the exhibition delights audiences and demonstrates that art is for people of all ages and walks of life. School Art showcases paintings, drawings, photographs, sculptures, and other works of art by more than 200 students in the city’s schools. The gallery is proud to work closely with Saskatoon’s educators and to continue its commitment to art at the primary and secondary levels.

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june j

June J. Jacobs and Gwen Klypak: Time Layered


January 24 to March 30, 2014
Opening Reception: Friday, January 24 at 8 p.m.

Using traditional techniques including weaving, felting, dyeing, crochet, and embroidery, Gwen Klypak’s layered works combine contrasting forms with structural and surface design embellishments. Informed by personal experience, her textile artworks contemplate the intimate relationship between the human body and the passage of time. She pursues her study and experimentation with the woven grid from her Saskatoon-area acreage. June J. Jacobs has exhibited her fibre works nationally and internationally. She lives and works in Meacham, where she owns and operates the Hand Wave Gallery. For more than 30 years, Jacobs has made sustained contributions to the fine craft community as a mentor, educator, and organizer.

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Trace Nelson

Trace Nelson: Walls of Intrigue and Cabinets of Curiosity


January 24 to March 30, 2014

Opening Reception: Friday, January 24 at 8 p.m.
Talk/Tour: Sunday, January 26 at 1 p.m. with artist Trace Nelson

Monkey Business Workshop
Sunday, January 26 at 2 p.m. with Trace Nelson

Trace Nelson’s Walls of Intrigue and Cabinets of Curiosity presents an ambitious body of work that places monkey imagery at the centre of her installation. She has mobilized the nostalgic affection for handcrafted sock monkeys into a compelling study of DIY cultures, collecting, crafting, play theory and the tangled relationships between culture, nature, and technology. Nelson’s installation is densely layered with wall mounted and free-standing monkey sculptures in varying sizes, wall drawings, framed and unframed paintings, as well as furniture upholstered with reused sweaters punctuated by video peepholes. In 2008, the Victoria artist embarked on a research project to construct 100 sock monkeys. As Nelson’s research veered into new hypotheses and materials, the cuddly toy monkeys morphed and took on more complex qualities. This monkey business provides a delightful and mischievous antidote to the seriousness of everyday life and perennial concerns about elitism in the arts. There is also a reference to the exoticism of Victorian collecting methods and the economical impulse to repurpose work socks into toys.

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comtemporary drawings

Contemporary Drawings from the National Gallery of Canada


January 24 to March 30, 2014

Opening Reception: Friday, January 24 at 8 p.m.
Talk/Tour: Friday, January 24 at 7 p.m. With NGC curator Rhiannon Vogl

This cutting-edge drawing exhibition brings together a selection of works made since 2000 by 25 Canadian and international artists and collectives. Represented artists with a Saskatoon connection include Alison Norlen, a professor in the Department of Art and Art History, University of Saskatchewan; and Luanne Martineau, who now lives in Montreal.

In the hands of the artists presented here, an array of media — including pencils and inks, watercolours, cut-outs and stamps — are vehicles for expressing physical or intangible experiences and documenting the world in both its vastness and minutia.

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