"Digital, LED Wheat, supported on a growing mechanical field ".  Photo by Cory Schewaga

Artists by Artists: Bruce Montcombroux and Cory Schewaga: Galicia


September 27, 2013 to January 5, 2014
Artists by Artists Mentorship Program
Bruce Montcombroux and Cory Schewaga: Galicia

Galicia is a synthetic wheat field where viewers interact with the work through a combination of actual and virtual activity. The objects are made of paper, glue, and electronics. Reflecting the growth cycles of a physical wheat field, the installation progresses through different states occurring through continued interaction by the viewer for the duration of the exhibition.

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They Made A Day

They Made A Day Be A Day Here


September 27, 2013 to January 5, 2014

They made a day be a day here.
They made a day be a day here.
They made a day be a day here by
a year by a year yearly they made a
day be a day here by the year.
Gertrude Stein, How to Write, 1931

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sharpie

Rewilding Modernity


September 27, 2013 to January 5, 2014
Talk/Tour: Sunday, October 20 at 1 p.m. with curator Lisa Baldissera

Contemporary art and the unique history of modernity in Saskatchewan and internationally are examined in this innovative exhibition. Featured are some of the most prominent artists working today in Canada and abroad, plus a selection of works from the 1950s to 1970s by Saskatchewan and international artists. A cornerstone of modern art emerged in our own backyard, at Emma Lake. The Emma Lake Workshops of the 1950s and 1960s formed a major part of Canada’s artistic legacy. They were led by eminent visiting artists and critics from around the world, including New York critic Clement Greenberg, American artists Donald Judd, Kenneth Noland and Frank Stella, American composer and artist John Cage, and English sculptor Sir Anthony Caro. A number of these participants had become aware of the province through its high-profile presence as the only region in North America to have elected a government on a socialist platform — a feat that was reported in the 1940s and early 50s in The New York Times, Time magazine and Newsweek.

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Iris Hauser and Cate Francis: Altered States


June 14 to September 15, 2013

In her mixed-media screenprints, Cate Francis explores the areas in society where technology, biology, and phenomenological experience intersect and impact one another. She posits a near future in which technological change has radically altered human beings and their environments, and imagines a world in which the body is regarded as a prosthesis. Corporeal and environmental limitations are viewed as engineering problems which can be remedied by science, furthering the psychological disconnection from these realms.

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Kim Adams

Kim Adams: Love Birds now on view at WDM


The exhibition, Kim Adams: Love Birds is on display at the Western Development Museum (WDM). This is the first collaborative project for the WDM and the Mendel Art Gallery.

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rodney

Rodney LaTourelle


June 14 to September 15, 2013

Rodney LaTourelle is a Canadian artist and writer based in Berlin. His large-scale colour installations, public artworks and architectural interventions explore the interplay of colour and physical space in an immersive viewing experience.

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Paul Emile Borduas, Composition (detail), 1942, gouache on paper

The Automatiste Revolution: Montreal 1941-1960


June 14 to September 15, 2013

Film Screening: Thursday, July 11 at 7 p.m. View four films about the Automatistes and abstract art in Canada. For details, see the events calendar.

Performances: Thursday, August 8 at 7 p.m. Dance and spoken word poetry by Free Flow Dance Company and the Saskatoon Slam Team. Reception.

The Automatiste Revolution is a comprehensive exhibition of the Automatiste group of artists, which included Jean-Paul Riopelle and Paul-Émile Borduas. Curated by art historian Roald Nasgaard, the exhibition presents 60 works of art, photographs, books, and other archival material, borrowed from public and private collections across Canada.

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Shaping Saskatchewan: the art scene 1936-1964


June 14 to September 15, 2013

Talk/Tour: Sunday, September 15 at 2 p.m. with curator Sandra Fraser

The emergence of a distinct art scene in Saskatchewan between 1936 and 1964 can be defined by several key moments and a number of determined artists and advocates. During this time period, many artists, art professors and collectors had emigrated from Europe and the United States, or had studied abroad. As a result, there was lively cross-fertilization of ideas and approaches to artmaking. These decades are notable for the camaraderie and support that existed amongst artists, as well as the formalization of that support through various associations and government agencies, the development of art education through the University of Saskatchewan and artists’ workshops, and the professional presentation of art and enhanced collecting activities through dedicated gallery spaces and travelling exhibition programs.

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An Art at the Mercy of Light: Recent Works by Eli Bornstein


June 14 to September 15, 2013

Curated by Winnipeg art historian Oliver Botar, An Art at the Mercy of Light is an exploration of structure, colour, space, and light through the work of Eli Bornstein. One of the province’s most influential artists for more than five decades, Bornstein is recognized internationally for his pioneering work with abstract reliefs.

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Barbara L. Reimer, Green Man 3, 2012, (detail), film developed in coffee solution

Bart Gazzola and Barbara Reimer: Green Man Portraits


March 22 to June 2, 2013

In 2010, Barbara Reimer received a Saskatchewan Arts Board grant to begin the Finding a Green Photo project. She travelled to Nicaragua to photograph landscapes, sites, and garbage. Reimer, developing images using a coffee-based solution, continues to examine the relationship of process versus content in photography.

Barbara Reimer is a practising artist, and a technician in the Department of Art and Art History, University of Saskatchewan. Her photos have appeared locally and abroad in exhibitions emphasizing waste, sustainability, and process.

Bart Gazzola, the AKA Gallery Coordinator, has written for Planet S, FUSE, and Canadian Art. He produces and hosts “The A Word” on CFCR 90.5 FM.


School Art

School Art


March 22 to May 26, 2013

Student Artist Talks: Sunday, May 12 at 2 p.m. with student artists

The Mendel Art Gallery is pleased to present the ever-popular School Art exhibition, an annual offering for more than 40 years. Celebrating the excellence of artmaking and creativity among the city’s young people, the exhibition delights audiences and demonstrates that art is for people of all ages and walks of life. School Art showcases paintings, drawings, photographs, sculptures, and other works of art by more than 200 students in Saskatoon’s elementary and secondary schools. The gallery is proud to work closely with Saskatoon’s educators and to continue its commitment to art at the primary and secondary levels.

The work is selected by a jury composed of representatives from Saskatoon Public Schools, Greater Saskatoon Catholic Schools, and the gallery. This jury chooses at least two works from each school. Three works are selected from schools with more than 350 students. In addition, a limited number of works are included on a merit basis

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Jason Baerg, Nomadic Bounce, 2012, installation detail, acrylic on wood.

Jason Baerg: Returning


This dynamic, multi-media exhibition features two recent works created by Jason Baerg, a Métis artist based in Toronto. The work in this exhibition includes a series of circular paintings from the Relations series, which draw on Baerg’s early training in abstraction combined with computer-generated elements. Also included is a new installation of figurative-abstract paintings, entitled Nomadic Bounce. Both works are presented alongside videos comprised of photo- and computer-based imagery, thus continuing Baerg’s commitment to new and traditional modes of art production and engagement.

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John Boyle, RL207 (detail), 1982, serigraph on steel, Gift of the artist 2004

The Home Show


March 22 to June 2, 2013

What does access to a museum collection mean? How do personal taste and experience inform a selection process? What does it mean to curate?

The Home Show is part of a series of investigations into the Mendel’s permanent collection that advance the collection as a site of shared encounters and as a way of making meaning. This exhibition takes a collaborative approach, where different points of view and diverse sensibilities inform the selection of works on display. Staff members at the Gallery have been invited to step beyond their usual tasks and delve into activities that are typically the purview of the curator.

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Horatio Walker, Posthumous Portrait of Alice Walker, circa 1891. Collection of Library and Archives Canada.

I Know You By Heart: Portrait Miniatures


March 22 to June 2, 2013

I Know You By Heart is an intimate exhibition of 35 portrait miniatures from the late 18th to the early 20th centuries. The works are from the collection of Library and Archives Canada, which holds more than 100 portrait miniatures. The portraits are primarily of Canadian subjects, including well-known figures from history, and lesser-known individuals. The works are mainly in watercolour and gouache, and most are painted on ivory.

General Lord William Howe, Mohawk Chief Major John Norton (Teyoninhokarawen), and Demasduit, one of the last Beothuks of Newfoundland, are amongst those whose portraits are featured in the exhibition. Canadian artist Horatio Walker (1858 – 1938) is represented in the show, along with the American artist James Peale, the British artist Lady Henrietta Martha Hamilton, and many other respected artists, along with several whose identities remain unknown.

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Humboldt Magnussen, Before We Compared Traumas (detail), 2012, pen on paper.

Artists by Artists: Zachari Logan & Humboldt Magnussen


January 25 to March 10, 2013
Opening Reception: Friday, January 25 at 8 p.m.

Humboldt Magnussen creates personal folk tales, layering themes of home, belonging, and survival. His hybrid characters function as surrogates, referencing people and places close to him, allowing him to explore elusive aspects of his own identity. Magnussen’s visual narratives include plant and animal life that reflect his experiences of growing up in rural Saskatchewan.

Magnussen is an Interdisciplinary Masters student at the Ontario College of Art and Design. He is co-founder of the Saskatoon queer arts festival, “Eat Your Art Out, Judy Garland,” and has exhibited his work nationally. His mentor, Zachari Logan, is a Saskatoon artist whose large-scale, detailed drawings have been included in group and solo exhibitions across the Americas and Europe.

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Dana Claxton, Baby Girlz Gotta Mustang (detail), 2008. National Gallery of Canada.

Steeling the Gaze: Portraits by Aboriginal Artists


Steeling the Gaze: Portraits by Aboriginal Artists
January 18—March 10

Opening Reception: Friday, January 25 at 8 p.m.
Talk/Tour: Friday, January 25 at 7 p.m., with co-curators Andrea Kunard and Steven Loft

Steeling the Gaze draws on the collection of the National Gallery of Canada (NGC). The exhibition features profoundly symbolic works by some of Canada’s celebrated Indigenous artists. The exhibition showcases images of Aboriginal peoples created by 12 Aboriginal artists: KC Adams, Carl Beam, Dana Claxton, Thirza Cuthand, Rosalie Favell, Kent Monkman, David Neel, Shelley Niro, Arthur Renwick, Greg Staats, Jeff Thomas, and Bear Witness. Together, the 51 works send a powerful message on the evolution of Aboriginal self-determination in Canada.

This deeply reflective exhibition showcases the National Gallery’s significant collection of portraits by Indigenous artists, as well as other works from private collections. Steeling the Gaze includes portrait photographs as well as video installations, in an exploration of how contemporary Aboriginal artists have used the portrait as a means of self-expression, in spite of its long, problematic history for their peoples. “The portrait is a European convention that exerts control over the subject,” explains co-curator Andrea Kunard. “In the past, Aboriginal people were often objectified for commercial purposes. They were represented as a dying race doomed by the inexorable march of ‘civilization.’ Contrary to this portrayal, they have neither vanished nor died out; they survived.”

For many Aboriginal peoples, taking control of the camera and placing oneself or others within the photographic frame is a courageous and political act. In defiance of the history described by Kunard, contemporary Aboriginal artists now reconstruct the narrative of race; they self-determine the image that manifests the reality of Aboriginal culture. The exhibition’s other co-curator, Stephen Loft, who was NGC’s first Curator-in-Residence, Indigenous Art, states, “By reconstructing the narrative of race, [the artists in this exhibition] have captured the wide plurality of Aboriginal histories, cultures, and contemporary realities and have created their own visual identities.” This kind of artmaking is not about identity politics, it is the assertion of cultural sovereignty.

Steeling the Gaze is co-curated by Andrea Kunard (National Gallery of Canada) and Steven Loft (National Visiting Trudeau Fellow at Ryerson University).

Lecture by curator Steven Loft: “Culture Shock”
Lecture by curator Andrea Kunard: “In the Line of Sight”
Audio tour with artist Rosalie Favell
Audio tour with artist Arthur Renwick
Audio tour with artist Jeff Thomas

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Stephen Hutchings, Approach, 2010, oil and charcoal on canvas, Collection of Glenbow Museum, Anonymous Gift, 2012.

Stephen Hutchings: Landscapes for the End of Time


Steven Hutchings: Landscapes for the End of Time
January 18—March 10
Organized by the Glenbow Museum

Opening Reception: Friday, January 25 at 8 p.m.
Talk/Tour: Sunday, January 27 at 2 p.m. with the artist, Stephen Hutchings

Musical Performance: Sunday, January 27 at 2:30 p.m.
Quartet for the End of Time, by Olivier Messiaen, performed by members of the Saskatoon Symphony Orchestra. Introduction by Stephen Hutchings.

This exhibition of immense landscape paintings by the Ottawa-based artist Stephen Hutchings is inspired by Quartet for the End of Time. The French composer Olivier Messiaen (1908-1992) created this piece of music with the Bible’s Book of Revelation in mind, while interned in a German prison camp during the Second World War. Whereas Messiaen’s musical composition literally accomplishes the end of time by separating rhythm from metre, Hutchings’ paintings do so by presenting landscapes that are severed from a connection to a particular time or place.

This exhibition acknowledges landscape as an active contemporary genre. It combines old-style photography with leading-edge computer design; it brings the huge scale of traditional history painting to the arena of landscape; it imbues the familiar with a sense of mystery and a heightened sense of consciousness; it shows how the objectifying power of technology, in this case the digital camera and the computer, can be subsumed by the subjective imperatives of mark-making and the human hand.

In the exhibition, Hutchings examines ideas of temporality, permanence and eternity. His evocative landscape paintings, resisting identification with any particular historical time or geographic place, hold their historical debts, contemporary explorations and timeless questions in one temporal moment: the present.

Stephen Hutchings: Landscapes for the End of Time has been organized and circulated by the Glenbow Museum, Calgary, Alberta.

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Alison Norlen: LUNA

Alison Norlen: LUNA


Alison Norlen: LUNA
January 25—March 10

Opening Reception: Friday, January 25 at 8 p.m.
Talk/Tour: Sunday, February 3 at 2 p.m. with artist Alison Norlen

Alison Norlen: LUNA marks new creative territory for this Saskatoon artist. The intricate welded architecture in this installation elaborates upon the expansive drawings and wire maquettes that have characterized her artistic practice during the last decade. Here, she reconstitutes monumental, 20th-century sites of leisure, fantasy and cultural artifice, such as the Crystal Palace, Luna Park, Brighton Pier, and Las Vegas.

Sensational and fantastic spaces have inspired Norlen, from her early theme park sculptures and pinball landscapes, to her series of drawn “Floats,” with their tangled collisions of rural fairgrounds, roadside attractions, and construction sites. Norlen’s more recent engagements on paper feature monolithic structures like the Spanish fortress, Alhambra, or obsolete industrial sites. Her work is futuristic yet nostalgic. There are elements of the industrial and monumental, yet they are never robust or invincible. Rather, they are eroded to ephemeral, vulnerable traces.

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