Cathryn Miller and Monique Martin: The Absolute Way of Things

Cathryn Miller and Monique Martin: The Absolute Way of Things


January 17 to March 22, 2015
Opens: Friday, January 16 at 8 p.m.

Using bees as the subject, the works explore the fragile nature of existence, the interplay between humans and small creatures, and the communications patterns of our world. The large-scale prints explore the relationships within the hives and how those relationships mimic and contradict those in the human population. The cyclical nature of bee and human populations is represented through the sequential nature of the artwork.

Both the newly recognized loss of bee populations and the historical links between bees and humans are referenced in the artwork.

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tammi

Tammi Campbell and Kara Uzelman: concerning certain events


January 17 to March 22, 2015
Opens: Friday, January 16 at 7 p.m.
Talk/Tour: Sunday, February 8 at 1 p.m. with artists’  Tammi Campbell and Kara Uzelmann: concerning certain events

Saskatchewan is known for many things. Home of medicare, the first arts board in North America, wheat, big skies, and The Englishman’s Boy. With the only elected socialist government in North America, Saskatchewan had a particular appeal in the 1940s and 50s: utopian chutzpah and an exotic locale.  Amongst the legendary outcomes of this period are the Emma Lake Artists’ Workshops and research undertaken into the therapeutic use of LSD. Tammi Campbell and Kara Uzelman are two Saskatchewan artists who are taking their artistic cues from this particular history.

Campbell’s work is a sustained investigation into the function of modernist painting, with a specific interest in artists who played a role in the development of abstraction here. She plays with the tropes and language of hard-edge abstraction especially, and is in that sense a painter’s painter. A series dedicated to Agnes Martin, a simple pencil sketch that Campbell executes each day she works in the studio, entices by its salutation, Dear Agnes, but denies the viewer any legible content. Her practice is a meditation on the process of making.

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Border Crossings Study Centre


January 17 to March 22, 2015
Opens: Friday, January 16 at 7 p.m.

Border Crossings magazine is one of the key platforms for the investigation of contemporary Canadian and international art and culture. Founded in 1977 by Robert Enright, this quarterly magazine is published in Winnipeg, and is responsible for bringing international attention to art production on the Prairies.

The Border Crossings Study Centre (BCSC) was developed by the magazine as a unique, mobile archive of the magazine’s 32-year publishing history, and includes copies of each of the magazines to date. It is housed in a portable hybrid storage/reading unit designed by architects Neil Minuk (DIN), and Karen Shanski and Eduardo Aquino (spmb). The archive is made up of the magazines themselves and, where issues were no longer available, handmade facsimiles were produced by Canadian photographer Elaine Stocki. It provides a welcoming social space for readers to look at individual issues, refer to the extensive Index, and talk about the material in the 127 issues of the magazine.

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Ursula Biemann: Deep Weather

Ursula Biemann: Deep Weather


January 17 to March 22, 2015
Opens: Friday, January 16 at 7 p.m.

The 2013 video, Deep Weather is a nine-minute glimpse of the Alberta tar sands, juxtaposed with the watery world of Bangladesh. The whispered, confiding voice-over makes viewers feel immediately complicit in the actions unfolding here. Deep Weather explores the devastating consequences of oil extraction. Aerial images of the scarred landscape of the Canadian tar sands give a sense of the vast scale of the damage: ashen contours, littered with the occasional digger, stretch over an area the size of England.

While human actions are paramount in what happens to the Earth, we have little awareness of, or control over, fluid and invisible global interactions. The enormous open-pit mines and steam processing of the oil-infused sand and clay of northern Alberta have drastically lowered Athabasca River flow to the Arctic Ocean; poisoned tailing ponds are replacing the boreal forests, altering ecology for an unknown future. Land is reduced to a commodity by multinational corporations with little or no concern for the planet’s future well-being.

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David Thauberger

David Thauberger: Road Trips and Other Diversions


April 11 to June 15, 2014
Opening Reception: Friday, April 11 at 8 p.m.
Talk/Tour: Friday, April 11 at 7 p.m. with curators Sandra Fraser and Timothy Long, and artist David Thauberger.
Documentary Screening: Tuesday, May 6 at 7 p.m. At the Broadway Theatre, Saskatoon, SK
Watch the trailer, visit the website, and download the iOS app.

Regina-based David Thauberger is a nationally recognized artist best known for his iconic paintings of vernacular architecture. Co-curated by Sandra Fraser, Associate Curator at the Mendel Art Gallery, and Timothy Long, Head Curator at the MacKenzie Art Gallery, the exhibition will provide the first comprehensive overview of this remarkable Canadian artist. Road Trips & Other Diversions brings together some 70 paintings, prints and ceramic works, produced from 1971 to 2009 and drawn from more than 30 public and private collections across the country.

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WarRugs

Battleground: War Rugs from Afghanistan


January 17 to March 22, 2015
Opens: Friday, January 16 at 7 p.m.
Talk/Tour:  Friday, January 16 at 7 p.m. with Shauna McCabe, Executive Director, Textile Museum of Canada

The terror of bombs falling from the sky and landmines exploding from the earth is revealed in Battleground: War Rugs from Afghanistan. Through three decades of international and civil war, Afghans have borne witness to disaster by weaving unprecedented images of battle and weaponry into their rugs. This touring exhibition tells the story of the Afghan world turned upside down.

The exhibition presents dozens of fascinating, woven documents of social and cultural events in Afghanistan from the last quarter of the 20th century, highlighting the critical role that creative practice plays in a global context.

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Mendel at night

Celebrate 50 years!


50TH ANNIVERSARY LAUNCH PARTY
Friday, September 26 at 7 p.m.

Everyone is invited to the launch for the fall anniversary season of celebrations. The evening begins with tributes from community members, who will share their Mendel memories.

This is followed by the opening of Modern Visions: The Mendel Art Gallery 50th Anniversary Exhibition, selected from the permanent collection.

Join in a toast to your gallery and enjoy the festivities!

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Sean Weisgerber

Marie Lannoo and Sean Weisgerber: Ricochet


June 27 to September 14, 2014

Opening Reception: Friday, June 27 at 8 p.m.

Sean Weisgerber and Marie Lannoo have shared studio space for close to three years and they have developed their project in response to working in such close proximity. Although working independently, through ongoing critical dialogue and feedback they have created new pieces that are in conversation with one another. Ricochet includes a selection of recent paintings and sculptural works by Weisgerber and Lannoo that reflects their rigorous process-driven practices.

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Convoluted Beauty: In the Company of Emily Carr


June 27 to September 14, 2014

The work of Emily Carr (1871-1945) is nationally respected for its pioneering of modernity in Western Canada. In her early career, Carr travelled to the United Kingdom to study art, determined to expand her creative vision. Instead, her time there (1899 to 1904), proved to be among the more challenging ordeals of her life, culminating in an 18-month hospitalization with the diagnosis of “hysteria.” Surprisingly, it became a formative point in her career, one where she resolutely declared her sense of her own Canadian as well as artistic identity.

This project, curated by Lisa Baldissera, Chief Curator, Mendel Art Gallery, is the first significant presentation of Emily Carr’s work in Saskatchewan in almost 20 years. It considers Carr’s London years to explore notions of the artistic imaginary and artistic identity. It touches on a variety of critical frameworks: the theme of exile, readings of affect and interspecies theory; an examination of hysteria and the clinic which moves beyond the psychoanalytic frameworks of the 1990s, and the concept of “unproductivity” in creative work.

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Adad Hannah

Sympathetic Magic


June 27 to September 14, 2014

Opening Reception: Friday, June 27 at 8 p.m.
Talk/Tour: Saturday, September 13 at 1 p.m. with curator Troy Gronsdahl

Canada has cultivated and maintained a strong symbolic connection with the northern landscape. The artistic production of Canada’s renowned early painters, the Group of Seven and their ilk, has both defined artistic practice at home and Canada abroad. As art historian John O’Brian observes in Wild Art History, “The land and its representations are knotted together, not unlike two other words with an affinity to landscape in contemporary thought — nation and nationalism.” The country as depicted by the progenitors of the Canadian landscape tradition is a pristine, untamed, and unpeopled place. A history of colonization and the development of the modern Canadian state are registered on countless paintings and postcards. Popular depictions of the landscape are telling: Canada is rich in natural beauty, abundant in resources, and open for business.

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Hughes

A Vital Force: The Canadian Group of Painters


June 27 to September 14, 2014

Opening Reception: Friday, June 27 at 8 p.m.
Talk/Tour: Sunday, June 29 at 1 p.m. with curator Alicia Boutilier

The significance of the first exhibition … is that it sums up the growth and development of the liberal spirit and demonstrates what a vital force it is. — Robert Ayre, The Canadian Forum, 1933

The Canadian Group of Painters (CGP) was the first to aspire to cross-country representation of modernist artists. It lasted from 1933 to 1967, but its strength of influence lay in the first two decades of its existence. When it burst upon the scene in its founding year, the Group pronounced itself “a direct outgrowth of the Group of Seven … drawn from the whole of Canada.” Twenty years later, it proclaimed a “tremendous development” had taken place: “This does not necessarily mean that localized imagery has been abandoned by artists, but it does mean that the imagery employed has become more cosmopolitan.”

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Joi_Arcand

Mary Longman and Joi T. Arcand


April 11 to June 15, 2014
Opening Reception: Friday, April 11 at 8 p.m.

Joi T. Arcand creates digital photo work that blends personal narratives with popular culture. Drawing from her experiences as a mixed-race nehiyaw woman, her work merges identity with nostalgia, humour, and kitsch. Connecting past with present, she digitally alters outdated imagery to create new conversations around Indigenous representation in pop culture.

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school-art

School Art


April 11 to June 8, 2014
Public Reception: Sunday, April 13, at 2 p.m.
Event for Teachers: Thursday, May 1, 4:15 to 5:45 p.m.
Student Artist Talks: Sunday, May 11 at 2 p.m. with participating artists.

The Mendel Art Gallery is pleased to present School Art, the highly popular exhibition offered annually for 42 years. Celebrating the excellence of artmaking and creativity among Saskatoon’s young people, the exhibition delights audiences and demonstrates that art is for people of all ages and walks of life. School Art showcases paintings, drawings, photographs, sculptures, and other works of art by more than 200 students in the city’s schools. The gallery is proud to work closely with Saskatoon’s educators and to continue its commitment to art at the primary and secondary levels.

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june j

June J. Jacobs and Gwen Klypak: Time Layered


January 24 to March 30, 2014
Opening Reception: Friday, January 24 at 8 p.m.

Using traditional techniques including weaving, felting, dyeing, crochet, and embroidery, Gwen Klypak’s layered works combine contrasting forms with structural and surface design embellishments. Informed by personal experience, her textile artworks contemplate the intimate relationship between the human body and the passage of time. She pursues her study and experimentation with the woven grid from her Saskatoon-area acreage. June J. Jacobs has exhibited her fibre works nationally and internationally. She lives and works in Meacham, where she owns and operates the Hand Wave Gallery. For more than 30 years, Jacobs has made sustained contributions to the fine craft community as a mentor, educator, and organizer.

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Trace Nelson

Trace Nelson: Walls of Intrigue and Cabinets of Curiosity


January 24 to March 30, 2014

Opening Reception: Friday, January 24 at 8 p.m.
Talk/Tour: Sunday, January 26 at 1 p.m. with artist Trace Nelson

Monkey Business Workshop
Sunday, January 26 at 2 p.m. with Trace Nelson

Trace Nelson’s Walls of Intrigue and Cabinets of Curiosity presents an ambitious body of work that places monkey imagery at the centre of her installation. She has mobilized the nostalgic affection for handcrafted sock monkeys into a compelling study of DIY cultures, collecting, crafting, play theory and the tangled relationships between culture, nature, and technology. Nelson’s installation is densely layered with wall mounted and free-standing monkey sculptures in varying sizes, wall drawings, framed and unframed paintings, as well as furniture upholstered with reused sweaters punctuated by video peepholes. In 2008, the Victoria artist embarked on a research project to construct 100 sock monkeys. As Nelson’s research veered into new hypotheses and materials, the cuddly toy monkeys morphed and took on more complex qualities. This monkey business provides a delightful and mischievous antidote to the seriousness of everyday life and perennial concerns about elitism in the arts. There is also a reference to the exoticism of Victorian collecting methods and the economical impulse to repurpose work socks into toys.

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comtemporary drawings

Contemporary Drawings from the National Gallery of Canada


January 24 to March 30, 2014

Opening Reception: Friday, January 24 at 8 p.m.
Talk/Tour: Friday, January 24 at 7 p.m. With NGC curator Rhiannon Vogl

This cutting-edge drawing exhibition brings together a selection of works made since 2000 by 25 Canadian and international artists and collectives. Represented artists with a Saskatoon connection include Alison Norlen, a professor in the Department of Art and Art History, University of Saskatchewan; and Luanne Martineau, who now lives in Montreal.

In the hands of the artists presented here, an array of media — including pencils and inks, watercolours, cut-outs and stamps — are vehicles for expressing physical or intangible experiences and documenting the world in both its vastness and minutia.

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"Digital, LED Wheat, supported on a growing mechanical field ".  Photo by Cory Schewaga

Artists by Artists: Bruce Montcombroux and Cory Schewaga: Galicia


September 27, 2013 to January 5, 2014
Artists by Artists Mentorship Program
Bruce Montcombroux and Cory Schewaga: Galicia

Galicia is a synthetic wheat field where viewers interact with the work through a combination of actual and virtual activity. The objects are made of paper, glue, and electronics. Reflecting the growth cycles of a physical wheat field, the installation progresses through different states occurring through continued interaction by the viewer for the duration of the exhibition.

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They Made A Day

They Made A Day Be A Day Here


September 27, 2013 to January 5, 2014

They made a day be a day here.
They made a day be a day here.
They made a day be a day here by
a year by a year yearly they made a
day be a day here by the year.
Gertrude Stein, How to Write, 1931

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sharpie

Rewilding Modernity


September 27, 2013 to January 5, 2014
Talk/Tour: Sunday, October 20 at 1 p.m. with curator Lisa Baldissera

Contemporary art and the unique history of modernity in Saskatchewan and internationally are examined in this innovative exhibition. Featured are some of the most prominent artists working today in Canada and abroad, plus a selection of works from the 1950s to 1970s by Saskatchewan and international artists. A cornerstone of modern art emerged in our own backyard, at Emma Lake. The Emma Lake Workshops of the 1950s and 1960s formed a major part of Canada’s artistic legacy. They were led by eminent visiting artists and critics from around the world, including New York critic Clement Greenberg, American artists Donald Judd, Kenneth Noland and Frank Stella, American composer and artist John Cage, and English sculptor Sir Anthony Caro. A number of these participants had become aware of the province through its high-profile presence as the only region in North America to have elected a government on a socialist platform — a feat that was reported in the 1940s and early 50s in The New York Times, Time magazine and Newsweek.

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Iris Hauser and Cate Francis: Altered States


June 14 to September 15, 2013

In her mixed-media screenprints, Cate Francis explores the areas in society where technology, biology, and phenomenological experience intersect and impact one another. She posits a near future in which technological change has radically altered human beings and their environments, and imagines a world in which the body is regarded as a prosthesis. Corporeal and environmental limitations are viewed as engineering problems which can be remedied by science, furthering the psychological disconnection from these realms.

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Kim Adams

Kim Adams: Love Birds now on view at WDM


The exhibition, Kim Adams: Love Birds is on display at the Western Development Museum (WDM). This is the first collaborative project for the WDM and the Mendel Art Gallery.

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rodney

Rodney LaTourelle


June 14 to September 15, 2013

Rodney LaTourelle is a Canadian artist and writer based in Berlin. His large-scale colour installations, public artworks and architectural interventions explore the interplay of colour and physical space in an immersive viewing experience.

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Paul Emile Borduas, Composition (detail), 1942, gouache on paper

The Automatiste Revolution: Montreal 1941-1960


June 14 to September 15, 2013

Film Screening: Thursday, July 11 at 7 p.m. View four films about the Automatistes and abstract art in Canada. For details, see the events calendar.

Performances: Thursday, August 8 at 7 p.m. Dance and spoken word poetry by Free Flow Dance Company and the Saskatoon Slam Team. Reception.

The Automatiste Revolution is a comprehensive exhibition of the Automatiste group of artists, which included Jean-Paul Riopelle and Paul-Émile Borduas. Curated by art historian Roald Nasgaard, the exhibition presents 60 works of art, photographs, books, and other archival material, borrowed from public and private collections across Canada.

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Shaping Saskatchewan: the art scene 1936-1964


June 14 to September 15, 2013

Talk/Tour: Sunday, September 15 at 2 p.m. with curator Sandra Fraser

The emergence of a distinct art scene in Saskatchewan between 1936 and 1964 can be defined by several key moments and a number of determined artists and advocates. During this time period, many artists, art professors and collectors had emigrated from Europe and the United States, or had studied abroad. As a result, there was lively cross-fertilization of ideas and approaches to artmaking. These decades are notable for the camaraderie and support that existed amongst artists, as well as the formalization of that support through various associations and government agencies, the development of art education through the University of Saskatchewan and artists’ workshops, and the professional presentation of art and enhanced collecting activities through dedicated gallery spaces and travelling exhibition programs.

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An Art at the Mercy of Light: Recent Works by Eli Bornstein


June 14 to September 15, 2013

Curated by Winnipeg art historian Oliver Botar, An Art at the Mercy of Light is an exploration of structure, colour, space, and light through the work of Eli Bornstein. One of the province’s most influential artists for more than five decades, Bornstein is recognized internationally for his pioneering work with abstract reliefs.

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Barbara L. Reimer, Green Man 3, 2012, (detail), film developed in coffee solution

Bart Gazzola and Barbara Reimer: Green Man Portraits


March 22 to June 2, 2013

In 2010, Barbara Reimer received a Saskatchewan Arts Board grant to begin the Finding a Green Photo project. She travelled to Nicaragua to photograph landscapes, sites, and garbage. Reimer, developing images using a coffee-based solution, continues to examine the relationship of process versus content in photography.

Barbara Reimer is a practising artist, and a technician in the Department of Art and Art History, University of Saskatchewan. Her photos have appeared locally and abroad in exhibitions emphasizing waste, sustainability, and process.

Bart Gazzola, the AKA Gallery Coordinator, has written for Planet S, FUSE, and Canadian Art. He produces and hosts “The A Word” on CFCR 90.5 FM.


School Art

School Art


March 22 to May 26, 2013

Student Artist Talks: Sunday, May 12 at 2 p.m. with student artists

The Mendel Art Gallery is pleased to present the ever-popular School Art exhibition, an annual offering for more than 40 years. Celebrating the excellence of artmaking and creativity among the city’s young people, the exhibition delights audiences and demonstrates that art is for people of all ages and walks of life. School Art showcases paintings, drawings, photographs, sculptures, and other works of art by more than 200 students in Saskatoon’s elementary and secondary schools. The gallery is proud to work closely with Saskatoon’s educators and to continue its commitment to art at the primary and secondary levels.

The work is selected by a jury composed of representatives from Saskatoon Public Schools, Greater Saskatoon Catholic Schools, and the gallery. This jury chooses at least two works from each school. Three works are selected from schools with more than 350 students. In addition, a limited number of works are included on a merit basis

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Jason Baerg, Nomadic Bounce, 2012, installation detail, acrylic on wood.

Jason Baerg: Returning


This dynamic, multi-media exhibition features two recent works created by Jason Baerg, a Métis artist based in Toronto. The work in this exhibition includes a series of circular paintings from the Relations series, which draw on Baerg’s early training in abstraction combined with computer-generated elements. Also included is a new installation of figurative-abstract paintings, entitled Nomadic Bounce. Both works are presented alongside videos comprised of photo- and computer-based imagery, thus continuing Baerg’s commitment to new and traditional modes of art production and engagement.

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John Boyle, RL207 (detail), 1982, serigraph on steel, Gift of the artist 2004

The Home Show


March 22 to June 2, 2013

What does access to a museum collection mean? How do personal taste and experience inform a selection process? What does it mean to curate?

The Home Show is part of a series of investigations into the Mendel’s permanent collection that advance the collection as a site of shared encounters and as a way of making meaning. This exhibition takes a collaborative approach, where different points of view and diverse sensibilities inform the selection of works on display. Staff members at the Gallery have been invited to step beyond their usual tasks and delve into activities that are typically the purview of the curator.

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Horatio Walker, Posthumous Portrait of Alice Walker, circa 1891. Collection of Library and Archives Canada.

I Know You By Heart: Portrait Miniatures


March 22 to June 2, 2013

I Know You By Heart is an intimate exhibition of 35 portrait miniatures from the late 18th to the early 20th centuries. The works are from the collection of Library and Archives Canada, which holds more than 100 portrait miniatures. The portraits are primarily of Canadian subjects, including well-known figures from history, and lesser-known individuals. The works are mainly in watercolour and gouache, and most are painted on ivory.

General Lord William Howe, Mohawk Chief Major John Norton (Teyoninhokarawen), and Demasduit, one of the last Beothuks of Newfoundland, are amongst those whose portraits are featured in the exhibition. Canadian artist Horatio Walker (1858 – 1938) is represented in the show, along with the American artist James Peale, the British artist Lady Henrietta Martha Hamilton, and many other respected artists, along with several whose identities remain unknown.

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Humboldt Magnussen, Before We Compared Traumas (detail), 2012, pen on paper.

Artists by Artists: Zachari Logan & Humboldt Magnussen


January 25 to March 10, 2013
Opening Reception: Friday, January 25 at 8 p.m.

Humboldt Magnussen creates personal folk tales, layering themes of home, belonging, and survival. His hybrid characters function as surrogates, referencing people and places close to him, allowing him to explore elusive aspects of his own identity. Magnussen’s visual narratives include plant and animal life that reflect his experiences of growing up in rural Saskatchewan.

Magnussen is an Interdisciplinary Masters student at the Ontario College of Art and Design. He is co-founder of the Saskatoon queer arts festival, “Eat Your Art Out, Judy Garland,” and has exhibited his work nationally. His mentor, Zachari Logan, is a Saskatoon artist whose large-scale, detailed drawings have been included in group and solo exhibitions across the Americas and Europe.

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Dana Claxton, Baby Girlz Gotta Mustang (detail), 2008. National Gallery of Canada.

Steeling the Gaze: Portraits by Aboriginal Artists


Steeling the Gaze: Portraits by Aboriginal Artists
January 18—March 10

Opening Reception: Friday, January 25 at 8 p.m.
Talk/Tour: Friday, January 25 at 7 p.m., with co-curators Andrea Kunard and Steven Loft

Steeling the Gaze draws on the collection of the National Gallery of Canada (NGC). The exhibition features profoundly symbolic works by some of Canada’s celebrated Indigenous artists. The exhibition showcases images of Aboriginal peoples created by 12 Aboriginal artists: KC Adams, Carl Beam, Dana Claxton, Thirza Cuthand, Rosalie Favell, Kent Monkman, David Neel, Shelley Niro, Arthur Renwick, Greg Staats, Jeff Thomas, and Bear Witness. Together, the 51 works send a powerful message on the evolution of Aboriginal self-determination in Canada.

This deeply reflective exhibition showcases the National Gallery’s significant collection of portraits by Indigenous artists, as well as other works from private collections. Steeling the Gaze includes portrait photographs as well as video installations, in an exploration of how contemporary Aboriginal artists have used the portrait as a means of self-expression, in spite of its long, problematic history for their peoples. “The portrait is a European convention that exerts control over the subject,” explains co-curator Andrea Kunard. “In the past, Aboriginal people were often objectified for commercial purposes. They were represented as a dying race doomed by the inexorable march of ‘civilization.’ Contrary to this portrayal, they have neither vanished nor died out; they survived.”

For many Aboriginal peoples, taking control of the camera and placing oneself or others within the photographic frame is a courageous and political act. In defiance of the history described by Kunard, contemporary Aboriginal artists now reconstruct the narrative of race; they self-determine the image that manifests the reality of Aboriginal culture. The exhibition’s other co-curator, Stephen Loft, who was NGC’s first Curator-in-Residence, Indigenous Art, states, “By reconstructing the narrative of race, [the artists in this exhibition] have captured the wide plurality of Aboriginal histories, cultures, and contemporary realities and have created their own visual identities.” This kind of artmaking is not about identity politics, it is the assertion of cultural sovereignty.

Steeling the Gaze is co-curated by Andrea Kunard (National Gallery of Canada) and Steven Loft (National Visiting Trudeau Fellow at Ryerson University).

Lecture by curator Steven Loft: “Culture Shock”
Lecture by curator Andrea Kunard: “In the Line of Sight”
Audio tour with artist Rosalie Favell
Audio tour with artist Arthur Renwick
Audio tour with artist Jeff Thomas

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Stephen Hutchings, Approach, 2010, oil and charcoal on canvas, Collection of Glenbow Museum, Anonymous Gift, 2012.

Stephen Hutchings: Landscapes for the End of Time


Steven Hutchings: Landscapes for the End of Time
January 18—March 10
Organized by the Glenbow Museum

Opening Reception: Friday, January 25 at 8 p.m.
Talk/Tour: Sunday, January 27 at 2 p.m. with the artist, Stephen Hutchings

Musical Performance: Sunday, January 27 at 2:30 p.m.
Quartet for the End of Time, by Olivier Messiaen, performed by members of the Saskatoon Symphony Orchestra. Introduction by Stephen Hutchings.

This exhibition of immense landscape paintings by the Ottawa-based artist Stephen Hutchings is inspired by Quartet for the End of Time. The French composer Olivier Messiaen (1908-1992) created this piece of music with the Bible’s Book of Revelation in mind, while interned in a German prison camp during the Second World War. Whereas Messiaen’s musical composition literally accomplishes the end of time by separating rhythm from metre, Hutchings’ paintings do so by presenting landscapes that are severed from a connection to a particular time or place.

This exhibition acknowledges landscape as an active contemporary genre. It combines old-style photography with leading-edge computer design; it brings the huge scale of traditional history painting to the arena of landscape; it imbues the familiar with a sense of mystery and a heightened sense of consciousness; it shows how the objectifying power of technology, in this case the digital camera and the computer, can be subsumed by the subjective imperatives of mark-making and the human hand.

In the exhibition, Hutchings examines ideas of temporality, permanence and eternity. His evocative landscape paintings, resisting identification with any particular historical time or geographic place, hold their historical debts, contemporary explorations and timeless questions in one temporal moment: the present.

Stephen Hutchings: Landscapes for the End of Time has been organized and circulated by the Glenbow Museum, Calgary, Alberta.

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Alison Norlen: LUNA

Alison Norlen: LUNA


Alison Norlen: LUNA
January 25—March 10

Opening Reception: Friday, January 25 at 8 p.m.
Talk/Tour: Sunday, February 3 at 2 p.m. with artist Alison Norlen

Alison Norlen: LUNA marks new creative territory for this Saskatoon artist. The intricate welded architecture in this installation elaborates upon the expansive drawings and wire maquettes that have characterized her artistic practice during the last decade. Here, she reconstitutes monumental, 20th-century sites of leisure, fantasy and cultural artifice, such as the Crystal Palace, Luna Park, Brighton Pier, and Las Vegas.

Sensational and fantastic spaces have inspired Norlen, from her early theme park sculptures and pinball landscapes, to her series of drawn “Floats,” with their tangled collisions of rural fairgrounds, roadside attractions, and construction sites. Norlen’s more recent engagements on paper feature monolithic structures like the Spanish fortress, Alhambra, or obsolete industrial sites. Her work is futuristic yet nostalgic. There are elements of the industrial and monumental, yet they are never robust or invincible. Rather, they are eroded to ephemeral, vulnerable traces.

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Megan Mormon, Art Party

Artists by Artists: Ruth Cuthand and Megan Morman


Art Party
September 28, 2012 to January 6, 2013
Opening Reception: Friday, September 28, 2012

Art Party’s candy-coloured tableaux narrate real and imagined relationships among queer Canadian visual artists. Obsessively patterned with the fusible plastic beads of her crafty childhood, Morman’s portraits examine friendship, insinuation, and the role of storytelling in establishing community.

Morman is based out of Saskatoon and Lethbridge. Her portraits, word games, and writing-based performances have appeared in festivals and publications across Canada. Her mentor, Ruth Cuthand, is a visual artist and educator in Saskatoon. Cuthand’s retrospective Back Talk, curated by Jen Budney, is touring nationally.


Bill Burns, Bird Radio and the Eames Chair Lounge (installation detail). Photo-Toni Hafkenscheid

Bill Burns: Bird Radio and the Eames Chair Lounge


Bill Burns: Bird Radio and the Eames Chair Lounge
September 28, 2012 to January 6, 2013

Opening Reception: Friday, September 28 at 8 p.m.
Talk/Tour: Friday, September 28 at 7 p.m. with the artist, Bill Burns

Bird Radio and the Eames Chair Lounge continues Bill Burns’ curious work about animals, knowledge, and society’s relationship with nature. Gallery visi­tors are invited to activate a chandelier of jerry-rigged birdcalls that transmits the simulated sound of birds beyond the gallery walls via radio. Burns, well-known for the quirky humor of his work, includes in the installation several examples of the 1950s Eames lounge chair.

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Brian Jungen, Dragonfly, 2008, Carved gallon gasoline jug. Courtesy Reesa Greenberg Toronto.

Beneath a Petroliferous Moon


Beneath a Petroliferous Moon
September 28, 2012 to January 6, 2013

Opening Reception: Friday, September 28 at 8 p.m.
Talk/Tour: Saturday, September 29 at 1 p.m., with artists Ernst Logar, Robyn Moody, and David LaRiviere, and curator Jen Budney

Video Screening: Land of Oil and Water, a 45-minute documentary about Alberta oil sands companies expanding into northern Saskatchewan. Co-director Neil McArthur of the University of Manitoba will attend.

Petroleum, in its extraction, distribution, utility, economics, and social, political, and environmental impacts, defines our contemporary world. Yet, in the developed countries that consume it most, it remains a strangely invisible substance, evident primarily at the clean and bright gas stations dotting our city streets and highways. In his fascinating account of international petroleum industry operations, Crude World, journalist Peter Maass argues that in North America oil is invisible most of the time, but “like gravity, it influences everything we do.”

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Zachari Logan, Eunuch Tapestry One, 2012, pastel on black paper, detail.

The Names of Things


The names of things
Terry Billings, Zachari Logan, Stacia Verigin
September 28 to January 6, 2013

Opening Reception: Friday, September 28 at 8 p.m.
Talk/Tour: Sunday, November 4 at 2 p.m.with artists Terry Billings, Zachari Logan,
Stacia Verigin, and curator Troy Gronsdahl.

In their diverse mixed media works, drawings and sculpture, Terry Billings, Zachari Logan, and Stacia Verigin explore the complex relationships between human experience and the natural world. Their work engages with natural forms and imagery to challenge assumptions about nature and consider the beauty and mystery of the world around us.

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Clare Hume, Power, 1972, gelatin silver print on paper. Collection of the Mendel Art Gallery. Gift of the Saskatoon Camera Club,1974

The Saskatoon Camera Club Celebrates 75 Years


June 22 to September 7, 2012
Opening Reception: Friday, June 22 at 8 p.m.

For 75 years, the Saskatoon Camera Club has been a valuable resource for people interested in photography. Its diverse membership includes teens and seniors, beginners and highly experienced photographers. The club has developed along with the art community and the city itself.

The inaugural meeting of the Camera Club was held at the Board of Trade office in 1936. The 31 founding members set the annual membership fee at $1. (The current fee is $40 per year.) By 1938, the club had 72 members. The venue shifted to Nutana Collegiate for six years, then members rented space with a darkroom in the Ross Block on Third Avenue.

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Biliana Velkova, All You Can Eat - Capitol (detail). 2012

Artists by Artists: David LaRiviere and Biliana Velkova


Public Relations
June 22 to September 23, 2012
Opening Reception: Friday, June 22, 2012

There are certain responsibilities inherent in the act of occupying a public space. With Public Relations, Biliana Velkova and David LaRiviere seek to intervene with public space, mounting their respective projects within the Mendel Art Gallery as a reflection of what may also be found around the streets of Saskatoon. Referencing the encroachment of advertising, Velkova and LaRiviere navigate such public spaces in order to examine the constituent elements of “responsibility” within a consumer culture.

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David Garneau, Fort Edmonton (1880s), 2006, acrylic on canvas. Collection of the Mendel Art Gallery.  Purchased with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Assistance program 2010, and with funds raised by the Gallery Group.

Where It’s At


June 22 to September 16, 2012

Where It’s At is one of the larger exhibitions drawn from the Mendel Art Gallery’s permanent collection. These works reflect the energy and success of Saskatchewan: it is indeed the place to be. The Gallery is also thriving and growing, continuing to present innovative, relevant exhibitions and public programs, and building an outstanding permanent collection that reflects and inspires this community. These artworks have been selected from hundreds acquired in the last several years through purchase or donation. They include sculpture, mixed media, painting, photography and works on paper.

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Weight in the form of a skull surmounted by a snake, early to mid 19th century, ivory, carnelian. Collection of the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria. Gift of David Young.

Edo: Arts of Japan’s Last Shogun Age (1603-1868)


June 22 to September 16, 2012
Opening Reception: Friday, June 22 at 8 p.m.
Talk/Tour: Sunday, June 24 at 1 p.m. with curator Barry Till

Edo refers to two things: it is the old name for the city of Tokyo, which, starting in 1615, under the rule of military leader or shogun, Tokugawa Ieyasu, transformed from a village into one of the world’s largest, most populous capitals—often called “the Venice of the East.” It is also the name for the historic period from 1603 until 1868, when Japan was ruled by shoguns from the Tokugawa family. The exhibition, Edo: Arts of Japan’s Last Shogun Age, explores the vast and unique influence this epoch had on the arts and culture of Japan. Edo: Arts of Japan’s Last Shogun Age (1603 –1868) is the most comprehensive exhibition of historical Japanese art ever displayed in Saskatoon, offering visitors an incredible opportunity to learn about the epoch and marvel at its magnificent cultural productions.

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Migrating Landscapes

Migrating Landscapes


January 19 to February 11, 2012

Thursday, January 19, at 7 p.m.
Reception for Migrating Landscapes in the Auditorium

Migrating Landscapes in the Gallery auditorium features regional entries in the national competition for the 2012 Venice Biennale in Architecture. This is the most important architecture exposition in the world. Canadian architects aged 45 and under were invited to submit a video and an original design for a dwelling reflecting on personal history of immigration/migration. The Mendel exhibition is one of seven regional exhibitions/competitions, followed by a final one at the Winnipeg Art Gallery this spring. Visit www.migratinglandscapes.ca for details.


Lynne Yamamoto, Silhouettes (detail), 1998-2011, silk-tissue paper and steel pins.

Paper Doll


March 30 to June 10, 2012
Opening Reception: Friday, March 30 at 8 p.m.
Talk/Tour: Friday, March 30 at 7 p.m. with curator Anne Koval and artists Ed Pien and Jeannie Thib

Paper Doll takes as its point of departure a rare, archival collection of hand-made paper dolls and doll clothes. Created by the American poet Sylvia Plath in her youth, they show her early skill as a visual artist and designer. This exhibition provides a space for the interplay between the Plath material and the works of seven contemporary artists. Much of this new artwork conceptualizes child’s play as a fantasy world remembered, recreated, and transformed. The themes of childhood, play, and the cutout are given new materiality and meaning by the artists included in this exhibition.

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Otto Greiner, The Dance, 1896, lithograph in red chine appliqué on wove paper. Purchased 1994. Collection of the National Gallery of Canada. Photo © NGC

The Symbolist Muse: A Selection of Prints from the National Gallery of Canada


January 20 to March 18, 2012
Opening Reception: Friday, January 27 at 8 p.m.

During the 1880s, some artists in Europe began exploring an inner vision. Their personal, philosophical work marked a staunch opposition to that of the Realist and Impressionist artists of the time, who focused on recording the exterior world. “Mystery,” “suggestion” and “dream” are terms that evoke the strange beauty of Symbolist art. The exhibition includes intriguing works by such renowned and influential artists as Paul Gauguin, Odilon Redon, Edvard Munch, Eugène Carrière and Jan Toorop. The Symbolist Muse consists of some 50 masterpieces from the permanent collection of the National Gallery of Canada.

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School Art

School Art: Celebrating 40 Years


March 30 to June 3, 2012
Public Reception: Sunday, April 1 at 2 p.m.
Student Artist Talks with participating artists in School Art: Sunday, May 13 at 2 p.m.

The Mendel Art Gallery is extremely pleased to present its 40th School Art exhibition! Celebrating the excellence of artmaking and creativity among the city’s young people, the ever-popular annual exhibition delights audiences and demonstrates that art is for people of all ages and walks of life. School Art showcases paintings, drawings, photographs, sculptures, and other works of art by more than 200 students in Saskatoon’s elementary and secondary schools. The Gallery is proud to work closely with Saskatoon’s educators and to continue its commitment to art at the primary and secondary levels.

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Cherry Blossom Dynaflow, 2010, Ceramic Collection of the Mann Art Gallery, Prince Albert.

Gasoline Alley and Other Sunday Dreams by Clint Neufeld


March 30 to June 10, 2012
Opening Reception: Friday, March 30 at 8 p.m.

Talk/Tour: Sunday, April 15 at 2 p.m. with curator Jen Budney and artist Clint Neufeld

Clint Neufeld, an artist based near Saskatoon in Osler, Saskatchewan, is ex-military and a former firefighter. His works embody the apparent contradictions between typically masculine pursuits and notions of beauty, ornamentation, and artistry. Taking the grease-monkey’s pre-occupation with muscle cars, he replicates the components of engines, transmissions, and axles in ceramic, finished like fine china, and sets them on elegant stands and furniture such as teacarts and chaises longues. The resulting sculptures ask viewers to consider men’s garage “tinkering” in terms of aesthetics, transformation, and even love.

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Bill Burns, Untitled (open book with caribou) (detail), 1999. Colour photograph on paper

Forced Perspective


March 30 to June 10, 2012
Opening Reception: Friday, March 30 at 8 p.m.

Drawn from the Mendel Art Gallery permanent collection, Forced Perspective employs the dynamics of scale and vantage point to develop themes related to culture and place. Working in scales ranging from the miniature to the monumental, artists in the exhibition represent diverse aesthetic traditions that have helped shape cultural life on the prairies.

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Brayers and Blisters: Inside a Printmaker’s Studio

Brayers and Blisters: Inside a Printmaker’s Studio


January 20 to March 18, 2012

Opening Reception: Friday, January 27 at 8 p.m.

With Brayers and Blisters, the Mendel Art Gallery presents an exploration of printmaking processes from plate to artist’s proof.

This intriguing look into a printmaker’s studio features a beautiful, custom-built printing press, woodblocks, etching plates, studio supplies, and other related paraphernalia. A series of free demonstrations and workshops led by local practitioners offers visitors hands-on experience and further insight into printmaking processes.

Brayers and Blisters is curated by Public Programs Assistant Troy Gronsdahl.


Jamelie Hassan, (Manuscript Page), 2005, colour photograph and neon light on panel. Collection of Museum London.

Jamelie Hassan: At the Far Edge of Words


January 20 to March 18, 2012
Opening Reception:
Friday, January 27 at 8 p.m.

Exhibition Talk/Tour: Sunday, January 29 at 12:30 p.m.
with Jamelie Hassan and Professor Lynne Bell

Since the 1970s, Jamelie Hassan’s work has been influenced by cultural politics, social activism, and her background as a Canadian born to immigrants from Lebanon. Jamelie Hassan: At the Far Edge of Words is the first exhibition surveying the 40-year career of this award-winning, London, Ontario artist. Featured are watercolours, photographs, ceramics, a billboard, and multi-media installations.

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Kai Chan, Aurora (detail), 1975,Cotton, nylon and wood, Collection of the artist Photo: Cheryl O'Brien.

Kai Chan: A Spider’s Logic


January 27 to March 18, 2012
Opening Reception: Friday, January 27 at 8 p.m.

Artist & Curators’ Talk/Tour: Friday, Janaury 27 at 7 p.m.

A Spider’s Logic brings together more than a dozen major works by Chinese-Canadian artist Kai Chan. Spanning 35 years, these works reveal the artist’s extraordinary conceptual and formal range, and illuminate his very personal manner of observing nature and the built environment.

Using everyday materials such as branches, thread, string, toothpicks, buttons and recycled plastic objects, and applying mixed-media techniques, he mixes, heaps, wraps, weaves, braids, layers, fastens, rolls, twists and stretches them to create fascinating and ingenious installations and sculptures.

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Benjamin Hettinga, Good Vibrations

Artists by Artists: Stacia Verigin and Benjamin Hettinga


Good Vibrations
January 27 to March 25, 2012

Good Vibrations features Benjamin Hettinga’s meticulous, hand-cut paper compositions, exploring pattern, colour, and line. His abiding interest in geometric design is informed by a wide variety of sources, from traditional textile patterns and ancient motifs to Op art. These intricate, labour-intensive paper works demonstrate Hettinga’s fascination with the handmade, an interest he shares with Stacia Verigin, his mentor. Verigin, who holds a Master’s Degree in sculpture from the University of Saskatchewan, hones her fabrication skills working as a contract prop builder for local television production companies. Her highly imaginative sculptures have delighted audiences across Canada.

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Left to Right: John Reeves, Marian McPartland (Pianist British), 1991. > John Reeves, Dizzy Gillespie (Trumpeter, Band Leader - U.S.), 1990. > John Reeves, Kei Akagi (Piano, Electric Keyboards - U.S.), 1990. > John Reeves, Billy Higgins (Drummer - U.S.), 1990.

Jazz: Photographs by John A. Reeves


June 24 to October 2, 2011

In 1997, the Mendel Art Gallery received a gift of 70 photographs by John A. Reeves. Born in Burlington, Ontario in 1938, Reeves is renowned as a photographer, writer and broadcaster. He became interested in photography while studying at the Ontario College of Art, from which he graduated in 1961. He then became a feature photographer for such magazines as Canadian Art, Maclean’s, Saturday Night and Jazz Report. Among the many exhibitions of his work are those at the Canadian Centre for Photography and the National Library of Canada in Ottawa; the Canadian Cultural Centre in Rome; and Harbourfront in Toronto. Jazz focuses on Reeves’ sensitive portraits of leading jazz musicians, including Dizzy Gillespie, Artie Shaw, Diana Krall and Oscar Peterson. Jazz is presented in partnership with the SaskTel Saskatchewan Jazz Festival, slated for June 24 to July 3 in Saskatoon. — Curated by Dan Ring, Curator Emeritus, Mendel Art Gallery.


Karla Griffin, Piano, 2010. Colour Photograph

Artists by Artists: Jennifer Crane and Karla Griffin


Coming and Going
September 30, 2011 to January 12, 2012

Coming and Going explores the ever-shifting relationships among people, places and objects, in connection with the notion of home as a construct of personal desire. Artists Jennifer Crane and Karla Griffin navigate both the private and public aspects of the domestic sphere in an attempt to capture the traces of human actions and experience. Focusing on empty interior spaces and abandoned household objects, these artists draw attention to the narrative and theatrical possibilities offered by their subject matter. Narrative is mainly evoked through an absence in the space or of the objects — as in a blank wall without pictures, or furniture without walls. Crane’s interiors reference the absent occupant while Griffin’s work points to the absence of a home and the actions of absent individuals.

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Lowrie Warrener: Northern Night (detail) ca. 1928, oil on canvas, Collection of the National Gallery of Canada, Gift of Rachel Warrener, Toronto, 1986.

Kathleen Munn and Lowrie Warrener: The Logic of Nature, the Romance of Space


September 30, 2011 to January 8, 2012

The work of Kathleen Munn and Lowrie Warrener represents some of the earliest abstract art in Canada as it first emerged during the 1920s and 30s. Munn, a New York-trained and Toronto-based artist, exhibited regularly from 1909 until the late 1930s. Sarnia-born Warrener also worked in Toronto during the 1920s and 30s; they both contributed paintings to the official Group of Seven exhibition held in 1928 and were included in that year’s influential Yearbook of the Arts compiled by renowned artist and writer Bertram Brooker.

This exhibition investigates these artists in relation to dominant artistic and philosophical movements of the period to provide a fuller, often alternative perspective on Canadian art. Munn’s great knowledge of theory led her to radically reinterpret traditional subjects such as religious and pastoral scenes into fractured, daring designs. She combined the mystical aspects of modernism with her own spiritual beliefs, culminating in her greatest series on the Passion of Christ. Warrener was a protégé of the Group of Seven, yet his landscape imagery is his own, projecting the lyrical stylization and bright cloisonnism of European art onto the Canadian wilderness. He also extended the search for ‘national’ cultural identity into the field of theatre, producing innovative stage designs and writing an avant-garde play with celebrated dramatist Herman Voaden.

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Jayce Salloum, map of the world (detail), 2000-2007. Tentest/cellutex/donnaconda boards, drawing with collage of photographs, objects & documents

Jayce Salloum: history of the present [selected works 1985-2009]


September 30, 2011 to January 8, 2012

The Mendel Art Gallery presents one of its most ambitions exhibitions to date, with Jayce Salloum: history of the present (selected works, 1985-2009), a coproduction of the Mendel Art Gallery with the Kamloops Art Gallery and the Confederation Centre Art Gallery in Charlottetown, PEI.

The show is a mid-career survey of the internationally recognized Canadian artist’s photo and video-based installation works, which explore identity, migration, and shifting borders and territories in the contemporary world.

Salloum pursues a varied career; he works as a curator and cultural activist, has founded artist collectives in Canada, the United States, and Lebanon, and practices as an artist at the intersection of text, video, installation and photographic work. The Lebanese-Canadian artist, whose grandparents immigrated to rural Saskatchewan in the 1930s, grew up in Kelowna and left home at 17 to travel and make art, a journey that led him across Canada, to Africa, and then to California. He is now based in Vancouver, but continues to travel constantly, making work and exhibiting his work all over the world.

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Michèle Mackasey: Cheryl Kemp and her Family (detail), 2010, 5ft h x 6.5ft w, Acrylic on linen

Michèle Mackasey: face à nous


September 30, 2011 to January 8, 2012

Saskatoon based artist, Michèle Mackasey has created a new body of work that puts the spotlight on single mothers. These large portrait paintings of local families capture the bond between mothers and their children, as well as point to the complex family dynamics where the father is literally out of the picture. In Mackasey’s life-size oil and acrylic paintings, the artist imbues her subjects with the dignity and stature that has been associated with portrait painting for centuries. Yet these portraits depict families, who continue to live on the margins, facing prejudice and economic hardship with mothers balancing the roles of sole provider and caregiver. Mackasey utilizes body language, facial expression and composition with great empathy in this moving and insightful series of paintings. 

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Betty Goodwin: Darkness and Memory

Betty Goodwin: Darkness and Memory


June 24 – September 18, 2011

Drawing from the permanent collection of the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal an ensemble of 27 works by Betty Goodwin, this touring exhibition offers a critical journey into a unique and luminous body of work where an acute awareness of the human condition combines with the knowledge that pain, death and oblivion are also part of the unconsciousness.

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Franz Johnston, Aftermath (detail), 1930. Gouache on paperboard. Collection of the Mendel Art Gallery. Gift of the Mendel family 1965.

The Mendel Gift


June 24 – September 11, 2011

Saskatoon would lack much of its verve without the contributions of one of its citizens: Frederick Salomon Mendel. In 1940, he came to this city with his wife, Clare, and their two daughters, Johanna and Eva. He was a prosperous, 52-year-old businessman fleeing from Nazi Germany, and within months of his arrival, he opened the enterprise that would become Intercontinental Packers Limited. Twenty years later, while managing the fourth largest meat processing plant in Canada and Saskatoon’s biggest industry, Fred Mendel approached Mayor Sidney Buckwold, to initiate the creation of a public art gallery. With Mr. Mendel’s philanthropy and funding from the province and city, the Mendel Art Gallery and Civic Conservatory opened to an enthusiastic public on October 16, 1964.

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Courtney Milne, image from The Pool Project (detail), 2000-2010

Courtney Milne: The Pool Project


June 24 – September 18, 2011

Courtney Milne was one of Canada’s most recognized professional photographers, renowned worldwide for his images of landscape and nature. He made more than 350,000 exposures, photographing in 35 countries and on all seven continents. He wrote more than 180 illustrated articles for photographic magazines and produced numerous popular books of photography of the Canadian prairies, as well as several books of images of global sacred sites and spiritual landscapes. His best-selling 1991 book, The Sacred Earth, features a foreword by His Holiness the Dalai Lama.

The Pool Project is Milne’s first solo exhibition at the Mendel Art Gallery. This unique collaborative project brings together more than 40 of Milne’s stunning colour photographs of the surface of his outdoor swimming pool, captured over the course of a decade (2000-2010) with the spiritual musings and reflections of a broad array of local and international personalities. The Pool Project is both a celebration of Milne’s unique ability to capture the qualities of light, colour, and texture and an opportunity for visitors of all backgrounds to contemplate aspects of the spiritual through art. For more information on the project, visit CourtneyMilne.com.

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Artists by Artists: Patrick Bulas and Jordan Schwab

Artists by Artists: Patrick Bulas and Jordan Schwab


Making a Good First Impression
June 24 – September 25, 2011

Making a Good First Impression is a spirited exploration of printmaking processes. Using unconventional approaches that range from etching with gunpowder to producing plates with a steamroller, master printmaker Patrick Bulas and recent MFA graduate, Jordan Schwab, take aim at a medium often fixated on process and technique. A selection of prints will be exhibited, accompanied by support material including sketches, plates and documentation of the various processes.

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Carole Epp, Idol hands (detail), 2011. Mid-fired white stoneware, underglaze, china paint.

Artists by Artists: Marsha Kennedy and Carole Epp


the politics of innocent dreams
April 15 to June 19, 2011

Carole Epp creates provocative ceramic sculptures that reference kitsch figurines, lowbrow art and consumer culture. These figurative tableaux explore human experience — death and love, hope and failure, family and social pressures — and seek to stimulate conversation, thought and action.

Epp lives and works in Saskatoon. She has exhibited her work locally, nationally and internationally and is editor of the popular ceramic arts blog, Musing About Mud. Her mentor, Marsha Kennedy, is an artist and educator based in Regina. Kennedy teaches painting and drawing at the University of Regina while maintaining an active studio practice.


Ruth Cuthand, Yellow Fever (detail), 2009. Beads and paint on suedeboard. Collection of the Mendel Art Gallery

RUTH CUTHAND: BACK TALK (Works 1983–2009)


RUTH CUTHAND: BACK TALK is a comprehensive, mid-career retrospective of one of Saskatchewan’s most significant contemporary artists. For over 30 years, this Saskatoon-based artist has been challenging mainstream perspectives on colonialism and the relationships between “settlers” and Natives in a practice marked by political invective, humour, and a deliberate crudeness of style. The exhibition brings together a comprehensive selection of artworks produced between 1983 and 2009.

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Karine Giboulo, Village Démocratie (Phase I) (detail), 2010, Polymere clay, acrylic, plexiglass and mixed materials.

Karine Giboulo and Olia Mishchenko: Habitaptation


April 15 to June 12, 2011

In Habitaptation, artists Karine Giboulo and Olia Mishchenko present new work examining the ways individuals interact with urban space. Whether these spaces are carefully planned or (d)evolve haphazardly, their humanity can be elusive, and their uses are difficult to predict. The artists draw attention to ideological concerns, gaps between vision and policy, and to the visceral realities of city life.

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Ashley Prigotzke-Beckett, Untitled (detail), acrylic and marker on paper. Mayfair Community School, Grade 3.

School Art 2011


April 15 to June 5, 2011
Public Reception: Sunday, April 17 at 2 p.m.

The annual exhibition School Art had been a Saskatoon favourite with Gallery visitors for nearly 40 years. It showcases the paintings, drawings, photographs, sculptures, and other works of art by more than 200 students in Saskatoon’s elementary and secondary schools. School Art delights audiences and pays tribute to Mendel Art Gallery founder Fred Mendel. It was Mendel’s passionate belief that art is for people of all ages and walks of life. The Gallery is proud to work closely with Saskatoon’s educators and to continue its commitment to art at the primary and secondary levels.

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Steph Krawchuk, The Rideau in Pink, Oil on canvas. 2010

Artists by Artists: Lorenzo Dupuis and Steph Krawchuk


In Sun and Snow
October 1, 2010 to January 9, 2011

Steph Krawchuk, a graduate of the University of Saskatchewan Fine Arts program, and mentor, Lorenzo Dupuis, bonded over a shared interest in the urban landscape. The pair met weekly, painting en plein air and from still life arrangements in the studio. In Sun and Snow features works produced by Krawchuk during these sessions.


Heather Nicol, Under my Skin (installation view). 2008

Under Skirt: A peek at the institution of art


October 1, 2010 to January 9, 2011
Curated by Jen Budney
Featuring The Cedar Tavern Singers, Nicole Cherubini, Dagmara Genda, Garry Neill Kennedy, and Heather Nicol.

Sassy, playful, and celebratory, this group exhibition examines the ways we look at, collect, and frame art in public art galleries and museums. The title, Under Skirt, refers to the act of viewing what is normally meant to be hidden, and emphasizes the feminine character of much of the work in the show, with its decorative qualities and attention to surface aesthetics.

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Willaim Perehudoff, AC-65-6 (detail), acrylic on canvas. 1965

The Optimism of Colour: William Perehudoff, a retrospective


October 1, 2010 to January 9, 2011
Guest Curated by Karen Wilkin

The Optimism of Colour is a major retrospective of the works of renowned Canadian abstract painter William Perehudoff. Drawn from public and private Canadian collections, the exhibition was organized for the Mendel Art Gallery by guest curator Karen Wilkin, of New York City. The exhibition will travel to the Kamloops Art Gallery, the Art Gallery of Windsor and the Robert McLaughlin Gallery in Oshawa in 2011 and 2012. It features more than 60 works, tracing the evolution of Perehudoff’s approach from early figurative works and murals to radiant abstractions, their interplays of colour suggesting musical chords. The exhibition emphasizes these latter works, which established the artist’s reputation nationally and internationally.

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Meghan Krauss, Hong Kong, 2010. In the Artists by Artists program

Artists by Artists: Ian Rawlinson and Meghan Krauss


The World Is Too Much With Us
January 21 to April 9, 2011

Meghan Krauss presents urban and landscape photographs reflecting her travels throughout North America, Australia, and Asia. The World Is Too Much With Us considers the human relationship to the natural world in the face of advanced urban development and subsequent environmental impact.

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Joseph Anderson, The Boys Encounter Aquatic Creatures Near the Ocean Floor (detail), 2010. In the exhibition, Wonderment

WONDERMENT


January 21 to April 3, 2011
curated by Sandra Fraser

WONDERMENT celebrates the role of fantasy in contemporary art. Together, Joseph Anderson (Saskatoon), Fiona Kinsella (Hamilton) and Joanne Lyons (Saskatoon) present a strange, imaginative world defined by the buoyancy of the inexplicable. The artists’ engaging works, including sculpture, installation, video and painting, blur boundaries between the real and the magical. Each artist explores the tensions individuals experience as they strive to understand the world around them, and the resulting mix of feelings —astonishment and apprehension, pleasure and disquiet.

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Berni Searle, Snow White, 2001. In the exhibition VARIATIONS

VARIATIONS


January 21 to April 3, 2011
curated by Jen Budney

The photo-based contemporary art in VARIATIONS examines changing social identities, states of being, and perception itself. The subjects in this dramatic collection range from “coloured” women in South Africa, to early 20th-century English criminals, to people living in the Riversdale area in Saskatoon. The global perspectives vary, yet Lee Henderson, Louise Noguchi and Berni Searle reveal common concerns: the importance of symbolism in contemporary life, the instability of identity, and the limitations of dualistic thinking. All three are fascinated by performance, particularly actions emphasizing repetition and endurance.

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Photograph attributed to Adolfo Farsari, Betto (groom), n.d. In the exhibition KOSHASHIN: The Hall Collection

KOSHASHIN: The Hall Collection of 19th Century Photographs of Japan


January 21 to April 3, 2011
Organized by the Art Gallery of Alberta

KOSHASHIN, Japanese for period photographs, presents a rare opportunity to view one of the world’s largest collections of early Japanese photography. There are more than 230 works in this exhibition, on loan from the personal collection of Edmontonian Arlene Hall. This was a private treasure until its debut at the Art Gallery of Alberta (AGA), which organized the exhibition in 2009.

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